Surveying the Cosmos – Part I

In this post I'm going to talk about a new 500 million dollar telescope,  the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), being built at Cerro Pachón in Chile,  and the survey of the cosmos it will  be undertaking over a 10 year period. Cerro Pachón is located in the foothills of the Andes at a latitude… Continue reading Surveying the Cosmos – Part I

How tides work

Although the Moon is much smaller and less massive than the Earth its gravitational field still has significant effects on the Earth. The most noticeable of these are tides, the periodic rise and fall of sea levels. High and low tides- Images from Wikimedia Commons     Causes of Tides The average Earth- Moon distance… Continue reading How tides work

Dark Sky Places

In this post I will talk about the work of the International Dark-Sky Association (https://www.darksky.org/)and the visit I made a few years ago to the Kielder Observatory, which is in the Northumberland Dark Sky park in northern  England. The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) was founded in 1988 by David Crawford a professional astronomer, who spent… Continue reading Dark Sky Places

The Goldbach Conjecture

One of the oldest and most famous unsolved mathematical problems is the Goldbach conjecture. This is Every even number greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two prime numbers. This problem was first posed in 1742 by the German mathematician Christian Goldbach and nearly three hundred years later no one has managed… Continue reading The Goldbach Conjecture

The Science Geek is now Explaining Science

When I started my Science Geek blog back in April 2014, I never expected it still to be up and running five years later.  Over these five years its popularity has gradually increased, and I now have around 2,300 followers.   However, after five years of blogging I feel now that it is time for… Continue reading The Science Geek is now Explaining Science